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Dogs and people have similar traits

Observe dogs outside stores and people at airports to see for yourself


While I waited in the car for my husband to make a quick errand into Home Depot the other day, I noticed a small, white fox terrier near the store's exit. He seemed rooted to the sidewalk as he intently waited, his perked, black ears hitting full-alert.

Probably a hundred customers went in and out of those doors, but the little terrier obliviously ignored them all. I began hoping Lawrence would be delayed so I could see the object of the dog's devotion.

As I sat watching, suddenly "Nipper" came to mind.

Now if you're under 50, you'll probably not recall the famous ad featuring a similar-appearing dog, named Nipper, sitting beside an old gramophone, listening for:

I was still reminiscing about Nipper when a husky man emerged with two sacks of potting soil on one shoulder and a couple of wooden planks on the other.

Obviously this man was the love of this dog's life because, if dogs can laugh, this one did!

His tongue lolled in a wide-open mouth while he jumped in pogo-like circles around his owner, trotting alongside, impatiently pacing until purchases were stowed in the pickup's bed.

Then, leaping into the cab, he gave his master's right ear a few loving licks, confidentially flopping on the seat until lumber, sacks of soil, truck and passengers rattled off into the sunset.

This was the second time I particularly remembered the little Nipper-like dog and his intense focus.

The first happened in Portland's airport several years earlier where I'd noted how each of us in the waiting area scanned, yet ignored, everyone else because our own eyes were similarly, intently fixed in spotting one certain person among the hundreds of arrivals coming up the jet way.

If others had been looking at me - instead of for their own loved one - they too would've observed my Nipper-like delight in spotting Lawrence - the object of my devotion - following his week's absence.

I trotted the corridors beside him, impatiently waiting at the baggage carousel tumbling out suitcase after suitcase.

After stowing his gear in our car, I hopped in beside him, content in just being with the one I loved while we, too, drove into the sunset: home.

"So… what's your story's point?" you're probably wondering.

Nothing really, I suppose. Just an observation as to what can happen when a single, long-ago recollection jogs another.

(Note: Nipper, 1884-1897 - first found as a stray in Bristol, England, subsequently became the most popular mascot and advertising logo of all time. A 25-foot-tall replica of this famous dog sits atop a building in Albany, N.Y.)

© Copyright 2013 by Isabel Torrey, a King City resident and 40-plus-year columnist.