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‘He is a good man’


My name is Dennis Rainey, and I am one of Tom Rainey’s six brothers. We also have three sisters. I have read the article “Tenant sues Oswego Pointe, claims pattern of harassment” in the July 2 Review and I have talked with Tom for many hours regarding the claims against him.

The picture painted in this article is not the person named in it. Tom has always been a very generous and helpful man. When we were growing up, Tom was my mentor in playing football, basketball and running track. He was the captain of a national championship college football team at Los Angeles State College (now California State University, Los Angeles).

When he started his own business, our mother and my daughter helped him with packaging and labeling his products for sale. While doing business locally, he recognized his success was brought about in part by his conviction to doing what was right. He believed in giving back.

Tom was involved in the initial startup of Love, Inc.’s South Bay chapter, which is now located in San Pedro, Calif. Since moving to Oregon, Tom has also helped rescue dogs in need of special care. He has also donated time in the past to the local chapter of Love, Inc. in the Lake Oswego area.

Tom is a good person. It upsets me to see this type of story, which scars him with no validity — only the hearsay of the complaining party. My brother is not the person portrayed here. He is a good man and loved by many.

Dennis Rainey

(via lakeoswegoreview.com)

Raise funds for Doernbecher

Children from across Oregon, Southwest Washington and beyond arrive daily at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital for treatment. Some need to stay in the hospital for long-term treatment. Their parents and siblings often accompany them and need to stay in Portland for weeks at a time. Imagine parents focused on their sick child also having to deal with the added burden of finding long-term housing for the rest of their family.

Oswego Friends of Doernbecher is proud to be kicking off fundraising for the new OHSU Patient and Family Guest House. This facility, to be built on the South Waterfront, will include more than 60 family-friendly suites and a common kitchen and gathering area for families and guests.

Help us by attending the NW Natural Street of Dreams in Lake Oswego from August 1-30. View the nine spectacular homes to see the latest in innovative building. When you purchase your tickets online, use the promotional code ‘kids’ and a portion of each ticket sold will benefit Doernbecher. Thousands attend the event, so imagine if everyone used the promotion code!

Additionally, we will be hosting a fundraiser Aug. 17 in the VIP area from 5-8:30 p.m. Gues-ts will have a chance to tour the homes, enjoy dinner catered by Celebrate Catering and participate in some surprises, with 100 percent of the proceeds benefitting Doernbecher. For details and ticket purchase information, go to oswegofriends.net.

Our community has always supported our fundraising efforts on behalf of the kids, and we ask you to do so again.

Lois Suwol

Lake Oswego

Support Glass Butterfly

I’m writing in support of all the businesses that have been told to vacate the Wizer Block in downtown Lake Oswego. In particular, I’m writing to support Phil Chizum, the owner of The Glass Butterfly, after reading his Citizen’s View last week (“After 26 years in downtown LO, I think there is a better way,” July 2).

The Glass Butterfly has been one of the centerpiece businesses of our retail core for more than 30 years. It’s threatened, of course, by developer Patrick Kessi’s football-field-size apartment complex, which Kessi and a compliant, all-too-eager Lake Oswego city government is attempting to rush into construction despite a pending court appeal.

Kessi has said “construction could start as early as September.” Not so fast.

First, Phil Chizum’s lease doesn’t expire until Oct. 1. Phil has the legal right to remain in his building until then. Second, before Kessi could even begin demolition of the Wizer complex, an abatement team would have to go through the building and remove any traces of old asbestos and lead paint. Only then could demolition start. Kessi hasn’t applied for a demolition permit.

Is Kessi threatening to bulldoze the buildings around The Glass Butterfly while Phil is still running his business? What do his statements reveal regarding his true intentions toward our long-time residents and our community?

I urge everyone to drop by all the current Wizer businesses and show your support with your purchases. Most important, drop by The Glass Butterfly between now and Oct. 1. Buy Phil’s merchandise, and voice your approval for his courage and for his unwillingness to buckle under to an outside developer and his unwanted complex.

Tom Grigg

Lake Oswego

A good day for personal liberty

Oregon’s “Right to Try” bill (HB 2300), which passed the Senate 29-0 on July 1, was re-passed with some restrictive amendments in the House by 60-0 on July 2. It now goes to Gov. Kate Brown’s desk for her signature. It will give many terminally ill Oregonians the right to try experimental drugs and devices not yet approved by the FDA.

Special thanks go to Rep. Mitch Greenlick,  Rep. Knute Buehler and Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson, who all starting working on this before the session even began in January and kept at it until the final bill passed both houses without one “no” vote.

The final bill is more restrictive than similar statutes in 21 other states (with its 18-year-old minimum age limit and its six-months-to-expected-death definition of terminal illness), but it’s a good start and hopefully can be expanded in the future to cover children and people who have terminal illnesses such as ALS, where patients may live for a number of years.

Oregon’s Cascade Policy Institute played a significant role in the passage of this bill, as did our sister organization, the Goldwater Institute of Arizona, which pioneered the “Right to Try” concept around the country. Personal liberty had a good day in Oregon last Friday.

Steve Buckstein

senior policy analyst and founder,

Cascade Policy Institute

Contract Publishing

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